Key competencies for nursing

Key competencies for nursing

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Concussion: Prevention, assessment, and management

Concussion: Prevention, assessment, and management

Early recognition is the first step to proper care. Takeaways: Preventing concussions is the cornerstone of care. Recognition and proper care of concussion is a priority to prevent injury and promote wellness in the pediatric population. Nurses are key players in the push to increase recognition and standardize treatment, making a significant impact on the prevention, recognition, and post-concussion care of youth athletes. By Margaret H. Granitto, MSN, ANP-BC, CNL, and Colleen Norton, PhD, RN, CCRN Concussion, a subset of…

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No simulation lab? No problem

No simulation lab? No problem

Learn how to bring the patient-simulator experience to nursing units to prepare for emergencies. Takeaways: Bring the patient simulator experience to your unit to practice mock codes. Ensure your nursing staff knows how to call a code. Confirm  nurses are comfortable with their crash carts on the unit. By Deb Sitter, MA, BSN, BSM, RN-BC, NEA-BC Because of low acuity and patient census, the critical access hospitals (CAH) where I work don’t experience many code blue and rapid response events….

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February 2018 Vol. 13 No. 2

February 2018 Vol. 13 No. 2

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Women living longer, living well. . .what healthcare providers need to know

Women living longer, living well. . .what healthcare providers need to know

Changing demographics affect patients and healthcare providers (HCPs) alike. Protecting access to preventive healthcare services (PHSs) across all life stages is an important aspect in today’s healthcare environment.   *By downloading this (product) you are opting in to receiving information from Healthcom Media and Affiliates. The details, including your email address/mobile number, may be used to keep you informed about future products and services. The post Women living longer, living well. . .what healthcare providers need to know appeared first…

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Is hospice care a two-way street?

Is hospice care a two-way street?

As a non-nurse, my perception of why nurses decide to work in hospice care centers around patients and families—relieving pain, assuaging fears, answering questions, being a comfort. But then I read a personal essay on Slate about a nurse who went from working in an emergency department to hospice care. My perception has changed. Working in hospice, for many nurses (not all), is more than a calling to care for others. It can be a way to heal themselves. The…

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Hospice nursing: A slower pace of care

Hospice nursing: A slower pace of care

It had never occurred to me before, but it makes perfect sense—hospice care moves at a slower pace than typical nursing. Nurses (and patients) have all experienced the fast, efficient movement’s of nurses performing care tasks. I’ve always been impressed by how some nurses can still stay engaged with their patients while moving at such a clip and having to pay attention to the details of I.V. lines, wound care, vital signs. In an article I read recently in the…

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Nurses report low competency in EBP

Nurses report low competency in EBP

Most nurses report that they aren’t competent in meeting any of the 24 evidence-based practice competencies (EBP), according to a survey published in Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing. Read more via Onlinelibrary.wiley.com. The post Nurses report low competency in EBP appeared first on American Nurse Today.

FDA says kratom not safe for any medical use

FDA says kratom not safe for any medical use

On Feb. 6, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a statement that included: “There is no evidence to indicate that kratom is safe or effective for any medical use.” The statement further noted that kratom, which has opioid properties shouldn’t be used as an alternative to prescription opioids and that deaths from it have occurred.Read more via Fda.gov. For another perspective, read Blogs.sciencemag.org. The post FDA says kratom not safe for any medical use appeared first on American Nurse…

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